Day 246 (Sept. 3): The lineage of King Saul, Nebuchadnezzar’s dream about a tree, Daniel explains Nebuchadnezzar’s dream and his fate, Nebuchadnezzar turns to God and his reign is restored, Ezekiel has vision of Jerusalem’s new thick walls, vision shows Ezekiel “Man of whose face shone like bronze” around the Temple

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

1 Chronicles 8:29-9:1

Daniel 4:1-37

Ezekiel 40:1-37

Questions & Observations

Q. (1 Chronicles 8:29-9:1a): This is the lineage of King Saul?  This is a “just-for-the-record” scripture?

A. As first king of Israel (even a corrupted one), Saul takes his place among the history of his people from the tribe of Benjamin.

Q. (Daniel 4:25): What is the seven periods of time?

A. Seven years.

O. (4:30): This sounds like a dramatic play.  My majestic splendor?  Get over yourself Nebuchadnezzar.

Q. (Ezekiel 40:10): Just a note that the three guard alcoves with the same measurements reminds me of the trinity.  What do you think?  Is there any significance with any other measurements or details of the Temple?  Why all the measuring?

A. God, via an angelic character, is giving Ezekiel a vision for the new temple, but I do not know exactly why the measurements play so heavily into the description.

Q. (40:34b, 37): Are the “eight steps” significant?

A. The steps increase as you get further into the temple- moving from three to seven, eight (as seen here) and ten for the inner parts of the court.  That would appear to indicate levels of importance or degrees of holiness.  The more steps you have, the more holy the section.

Day 238 (Aug. 26): Nebuchadnezzar frees Jeremiah, Jeremiah returns to Jerulsalem, Babylonian Captain of the Guard Nebuzaradan, oversees the destruction of Jerusalem, Babylonians strip Jerusalem of temple’s bronze, 70 years of rest for the land of Judah, Jeremiah mourns for Jerusalem in Lamentations

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Jeremiah 39:11-18

Jeremiah 40:1-6

2 Kings 25:8-21

Jeremiah 52:12-27

2 Chronicles 36:15-21

Lamentations 1:1-22

Questions & Observations

Q. (Jeremiah 39:11-40:6): So, Nebuchadnezzar understands that Babylon’s taking of Jerusalem is all of God’s doing, just as Jeremiah had prophesied.  And, thus, he releases Jeremiah because he is God’s messenger.

A. It does appear that way, yes.  God has clearly intervened in the mind of the king on Jeremiah’s behalf.

Q. (39:16): We have seen Ebed-melech the Ethiopian a couple of times now.  Is this connection to him or Ethiopia of significance?

A. He was a palace official of some sort, and apparently not a Jew, but his loyalty to Jeremiah (he’s the man who rescued him from the cistern in chapter 38) caused God to spare his life.  We don’t really know anything else about him, as these are the only two references to the name (38 and 39).

Q. (2 Kings 25:8-21): Now what happened?  I thought King Nebuchadnezzar and his followers were now respecting God after His messages came true.  But here, they are ravishing Jerusalem.  Then, in v. 18, I thought Zedekiah and all of the leaders fled Jerusalem the night that the Babylonian soldiers stormed the city.  Maybe the priests stayed behind.  The priests that were taken were not godly, right?

A. Nope, bad priests, just like the bad fruit God said would be left behind.  Jerusalem was destroyed because of Zedekiah’s revolt, and Nebuchadnezzar showed no mercy, as God intended.  God, as the reading indicates, desired for the land of Judah to be “fallow” and renewed in time.

Q. (2 Kings 25:13-17): There is a lot of bronze here!

A. It was the most accessible material for making shapes and metallic objects.  Iron ore was very expensive, as were silver and gold, obviously.

O. I had an epiphany earlier today.  It’s one of those that I should have realized a long time ago.  Sometimes, I’m a little slow!  Here God raised up Israel to be His model nation, to show the world what God can do for His people.  I had always thought of the other nations as Israel’s enemy, but God loved them too.  He wanted them to look to Israel and learn and love.  But, Israel failed Him time and time again.  So, not only was Israel failing God and themselves, they were failing the whole world because they were not a good ambassador for God.  Also, a destruction ordered by His own authority, how hard it must have been for God to see the beautiful city that Solomon built and God blessed be destroyed.  I guess He did it to let the land lay fallow and heal from all of the wickedness.

Q. (Lamentations 1:1-2): How beautiful Jerusalem is personified here — literally, not spiritually.  Jeremiah writes this as if there is a female beholder of Jerusalem and now her wickedness is crushed and she no longer has anyone to partner with.

A. It is a powerful lament for the city — note that it is an acrostic with the Hebrew alphabet like several of the Psalms we read — by the man that has been known throughout the ages as the “weeping” prophet.

Q. There sure are a lot of Babylonian names that begin with an “N”.

A. The Babylonian deity of wisdom — and the son of one of their primary god Marduk — was known as Nabu or Nebo.  Nebuchadnezzar means, “god Nabu, defend my firstborn son,” and many of these other names also relate to the deity Nabu.  It is a similar reason to why many names in Hebrew (when translated into English) begin with “J” (Joshua, Joseph, Jabez, Jacob, Jeremiah etc.)- the Hebrew name from God is transliterated in Egnlish as Jehovah (Yahweh).

 

Day 142 (May 22): Solomon builds his palace, Great and grand is the interior and furnishings for the Lord’s temple

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

1 Kings 7:1-51

2 Chronicles 3:15-4:22

Questions & Observations

Q. (1 Kings 7:1-12): It sounds like Solomon is building his ego with a palace larger than the temple he’s building for God.  It took him almost twice as long to build his palace than the Lord’s temple.

A. Yes, I would say so.  This is not Solomon’s, uh, wisest move, is it?

Q. (7:13-51): This description of the Lord’s temple is so detailed that it sounds as if it came from God himself.  I think Solomon has certainly honored God with such a lavish place!  Does God comment on the temple later?  I wonder if it’s pleasing to Him.

A. You will find out very soon.  The next step will be to dedicate it.

Q. Is there any of these designer details of the Temple that we should take note of?

A. Other than the objects in question are absolutely massive?  I would say that’s the only thing that needs to be made clear.  This is a massive building — even by modern standards — in every way recognizing, but being superior to, the design of the Wilderness Tabernacle.  Solomon intended his Temple to be eternal (1 Kings 9:13), so he used his father’s fortune in resources to do the best that he could to make it that way.