Day 360a (Dec. 26): Jude’s letter is similar to Peter’s second letter, beware of false teachers, remain strong in the faith as you did from the beginning, Jesus appears to John holding seven stars (angels of the seven churches) and standing amidst seven gold lampstands, church of Ephesus is told to return the strong faith they had in the beginning, church in Smyrna told of impending suffering but a reward comes afterward, Pergamum church is told to rid itself of evil teaching, and church of Thyatira is warned of Jezebel’s sexual promiscuity but tells others to hold true to their faith because they will get authority of the Father to rule

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

The letter from Jude addresses many of the same concerns as Peter’s second letter, which suggests that the two letters were written at about the same time and to the same churches.

Jude 1:1-25

We are here at the last book of the Bible.  You did it!  This is a book like no other book in the Bible which can be quite confusing, so Rob offered up an introduction to Revelations.  It’s the next blog dated Day 360b.  Thanks, Rob!

Revelation 1-2:29

John wrote Revelation from the Island of Patmos, where he was exiled “for preaching the word of God and for (his) testimony about Jesus” (1:9).  This occurred either during the mid-60s, during Nero’s reign and before the destruction of Jerusalem, or during the mid-90s, during the reign of Domitian.

Questions & Observations

Q. (Jude 1:1): Jude was Jesus’s brother too, right?

A. Jesus had a brother named Jude (also known as Judas, but not the fallen apostle), and tradition holds that this is the writer of this brief epistle.

Q. (Revelations 1:4): What is “sevenfold Spirit”?  What is the significance of seven spirits, seven stars, seven lampstands, and seven churches?

A. The number seven represents completeness, so the usage of seven is used here to have a double meaning.  It represents the presence of the seven churches — which they would have considered to each have a lampstand, a symbol of the power of God and a guardian angel — that the letter is written to, but also the seven represents the ENTIRE eternal Church body.  John is cleverly using a well-known image of the seven days taken to complete Creation (there are many similar OT images in Revelation, as we shall see) for his own purposes.  The more OT you know, the easier it is to unravel many of the mysteries of Revelation.

Q. (1:20): So, we have seen quite a change in God’s people.  The Israelite’s started out with Abraham, grew and grew to a large nation, then salvation was shared with the Gentiles and now God addresses the churches.  The “church” seems like an establishment that God wants us to make.  It’s a model of how we can all work as one for a greater good.

A. The local community church is, to mince no words, the center of God’s plan for the salvation of the ENTIRE WORLD!  So it is not really shocking that the Spirit, through John, writes to both encourage and correct congregations of this day.

Q. (2:13): Can you explain Satan’s “throne” being in Pergamum?

A. We don’t exactly know, but there are a few theories.  The most common theory is that it refers to one of the many pagan temples located in the city — most likely the massive temple to the God Jupiter/Zeus.  It was also a major “hub” of that portion of the Roman Empire, and many important rulings were issued from there, making it a “throne” area of this enemy of the Church, the Empire itself.  A throne would be a place of comfort for a “king,” in this case Satan, so another theory is that John is referring to the city being a place of comfort for the enemy king, Satan himself.  Any of those, or some combination of all of them, is probably what John has in mind.  It is a symbolic image, like many we will see in this text.  Keep reading this section for more!

Q. (2:17): What’s the white stone?

A. In the ancient world, a white stone was often “issued” as a ticket for an important event, such as a festival or wedding.  Thus, Jesus giving a person a stone with a name (likely engraved) on it should be understood as that person being invited to the ultimate celebration: His wedding (more to come on this).

Q. (2:20): Didn’t we read about another Jezebel who was a king’s wife in the OT?  Any similarities between her and this one?

A. Yes we did.  Jezebel was a great enemy of the true people of God in the OT, and so John is using her name symbolically — a running theme here — to describe a woman in the congregation who is leading people away from the true path, as Jezebel did centuries ago.  One of the recurring themes here is in this type of cryptic literature — the genre is called apocalyptic — is that the author wants to keep the true meaning of what he is saying hidden from outsiders.  So by repeatedly using names and symbols of the OT, which Jews and Christians would have been familiar with but most Greeks and Romans would not have, he can convey clear imagery to those in the “know,” but outsiders are not clear on the meaning.  It’s the ultimate in “insider” writing.

Q. (2:26): What is special about Thyatira?  Is it because those who are strong-willed enough to resist Jezebel deserve a reward?  I have thought a lot lately about how strong sexual desire is — I think probably more among men — and the reason for it.  Maybe a very hard test?  Manlihood, or to show one’s success, is a strong desire, so for men to give that up and submit to God would be a big obstacle to overcome and worth a reward?  (If you haven’t watched the movie Flywheel, it is a good movie about a man giving up his proudful manlihood and control and giving his life to God.)

A. The rewards that you see for each of the churches — there are four more to come — are speaking of the general “rewards” of being faithful to Christ, and I do not believe that there are particular rewards that will not be given to others.  It is simply a way to keep from repeating himself.

Day 355 (Dec. 21): Love all, respect marriage, God will never fail us, World is not our permanent home, Peter reminds believers that they were chosen, believers have hope for the priceless inheritance in heaven, trials make your faith genuine and strong, faith will earn you praise when Jesus returns, call to holy living for sake of salvation, love deeply, purify yourselves by getting rid of all evil behavior

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Hebrews 13:1-25

Peter wrote his first and second letter from Rome shortly before his death, which probably occurred in AD 64 during the persecution of Nero.

1 Peter 1-2:3

Questions & Observations

Q. (Hebrews 13:1): So the angels delight in humans when we are kind to strangers?

A. It would appear so.  That certainly reflects the joy in heaven that Jesus describes in Luke 15.

Q. (13:13-14): Wow.  I never thought about the fact that Jesus blood was shed outside the city, making him an outcast.  As Christians, we do feel as outsiders for a good portion of the time.  But, we can find respite in the community of believers.  Also, I know I have said this before and I don’t think it’s out of discontentment, but I have never really felt at home, like I was totally happy in a place.  I was close living in Hawaii, like 90 percent close.  It is so beautiful there, what I would picture heaven to be.  But, I remember growing up that I just didn’t feel like I belonged in Kansas (spare me the Dorothy jokes, please J).  And, we moved to Florida after my husband retired from the Navy, as it was closer to the likes of Hawaii, but it still doesn’t do it for me.  Then, if we did ever move back, I would be far away from family again.  So, I just think that no place is perfect and I’ll find my spot in heaven and be totally happy.

A. Peter is noting here the special role Jesus’ body had in the sacrifice he offered: the “scape goat” took the sin of the people outside of the camp (one image — Lev 16:8), and the carcasses of certain animals used in the sacrifices were burned outside of the camp because they were unclean (another image).  In short, the idea here is that since Jesus was taken outside of the “camp” (Jerusalem) to die, he symbolically took all of the sin with Him, which was God’s plan from the beginning.

Q. (13:21): To me, this is telling us to use those God-given talents we have and make them work for His glory and good!  Use the tools He gave you to grow God’s house.

A. That image of “producing” in us comes from John 15, where Jesus tells us about abiding in Him in order to thrive and produce good fruit.

Q. (1 Peter 1:1): Here is that word, “chosen,” again.  I am setting the meaning of the “chosen” matter that God knows our hearts before we are born.  He knows we will choose Him, and thus, He has chosen those people for His kingdom.  I can HOPE in this that I am correct.  But, this “chosen” issue I have been uncertain on, so I can hope that I will get my understanding resolved.

A. I will be no help to you in this instance, I am afraid.  Protestants have been arguing about what it means to be chosen for 500 years, so it’s pretty well worn ground.  The idea of being chosen is a dividing point between Calvinism and Arminianism — Calvinists assume election based upon nothing more than God’s free choice, while Armenians, as you suggest, see this as selection by foreknowledge.  I leave it to you to decide.

O. (1:7b): Another reason to have faith in Jesus!

Q. (1:12) Pretty cool that humans are going through something that even the angels don’t know until it’s happening.

A. It is indeed an intriguing thought that beings outside of time do not know our fate, and are in suspense of sorts.  No wonder there is rejoicing in heaven!

Q. (1:15): I have a ways to go to be holy in everything I do, but at least when I know that I mess up, I apologize a.s.a.p.

A. Forgiveness and grace are the main tools that God uses to drive us to be better disciples.

Q. (1:17): Judge according to what we do … I thought we were saved by faith alone.  Is it saved by faith, judged by works?

A. Yes, you’ve got it.

Q. (1:20): So God and Jesus have known all along that Jesus would die on the cross to save us from our sins.  God seemed so disappointed with Adam and Eve, but He knew they were going to sin?  Also, some places say that God chose Jesus to be our atonement and other places say Jesus gave up himself for our sins.  Will you explain this difference?

A. Coming back around to the free will question you asked earlier: the question you ask here is a big part of the reason I lean towards free will instead of predestination — the accounting for human choice.  God has known all ends since the beginning (no one doubts that), but God took the risk and created our race because, in my opinion, He values our choice to love Him above all other things.  We must CHOOSE to follow Him, though He certainly guides our steps.  But as soon as you, or even God, open the possibility of choosing love, you have given the person the possibility of also choosing to not love, to reject relationship.  God is not interested in robots, He desires children who want to love Him, but that must, by definition, involve a choice.  Nothing pleases me more as a father of a little girl than when she runs up to me coming through the front door and says, “daddy, daddy!”  I do not make her do that, she does it out of her limited understanding of what love is — and she chooses to love me.  Is that love always guaranteed?  Of course not (something surely God understands), but God appears willing to risk the rejection of relationship for the chance that His children will come to know and love Him.  That is Good News if ever there was any.

Q. (1:22): Does brothers and sisters mean those in Christ or everyone, believers or not?

A. He’s referring to believers — note the first half of the verse — but surely Peter would not disagree with loving those who are not.

Day 344 (Dec. 10): Paul writes to his good friend Philemon, Paul asks Philemon to welcome Onesimus, Paul writes to Philippians praising ther faith, Paul rejoices that Good News is being preached, Paul wants to live to continue his teaching, live as citizens of heaven, Paul said suffering for Christ is a privilege, Jesus’ humility earns Him the highest honor

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Philemon 1:1-25

Philippians 1-2:11

Questions & Observations

O. Rob, I don’t have anything to say about this Scripture except a short summary because our pastor just covered this very issue a month or so ago.  Onesimus left (ran away from) his master, Philemon, in order to be free.  He met Paul in Rome and they became close.  Paul wrote Philemon to tell him to go easy on Onesimus from running away because Onesimus had changed tremendously and loved God.

Q. (Philippians 1:20-26): Is Paul starting to fail in health?  He sounds like he could be questioning his livelihood.

A. I think he knows that time is short, and that he may be a prisoner for the rest of his life, which may not last long.  These “prison letters” read like they are from a man who knows that time is short, and he is acting accordingly.

Q. (Philippians 2:6-8): Why is this section indented?  It’s not a scripture as far as I can tell.  What is it?

A. This is probably one of the earliest known recordings of an early Christian hymn — a song about the faith that Paul is sharing to help make his argument.  He appears to be quoting the lyrics to an early Christian song that teaches about how they understood the nature of Jesus Christ, who was both God and man.

Day 338 (Dec. 4): Paul appears before Felix for questioning, Felix keeps Paul in prison to remain in good standing with Jews, Festus replaces Felix and hears Paul’s case, Paul appeals to have his case decided by emperor, King Agrippa listens to Paul’s case, leaders decide Paul is innocent

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Acts 24-26:32

Questions & Observations

Q. (Acts 24:1-27): Felix sounds conflicted between wanting to accept the Way and remaining in favor with the Jews.

A. I don’t think he is interested in becoming a Christian — he’s just aware of the movement — but he is indeed being a politician regarding currying the Jews’ favor.  The region was rife with revolutionaries who will seek to violently overthrow Roman rule in a few years, so Felix is certainly interested in looking good to his boss, the emperor, by keeping the peace in a lawless area.

Q. (25:1-22): I think it’s interesting to see politics play into justice the same way it can today.  They are tempted by what would seem right and make their lives better vs. doing what is right by the court law.

A. It’s a unique story in the NT, that is for sure.

Q. (Acts 25:23-26:32): So the last line was a surprise.  Paul appealed to Caesar for his defense because, as a Roman citizen, he has the right to, right?  But, now since he appealed to him he is required to go even if the Jews find him innocent?  There must be a reason that he has to go to Rome.  Time will tell, right?

A. Paul did so intentionally in order to have the chance to proclaim the Gospel, just as he did here.  We will indeed see how this goes…

Day 312 (Nov. 8): Peter heals lame beggar, Peter preaches about Jesus, council tries to hush Peter and John, disciples pray for courage, believers become a community sharing wealth and possessions, Ananias and Sapphira try to cheat eh church, disciples heal many, disciples imprisoned but escape, disciples flogged but continued to preach about Jesus!

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Acts 3-5:42

Questions & Observations

Q. (Acts 3:22): Why did Moses refer to Jesus as a Prophet instead of the Messiah?

A. Remember that Messiah is a title that means “anointed” or “chosen,” and one of the OT offices that was anointed was the office of Prophet (the others are King and Priest, more on those later).  So when Moses refers to the One who is coming as a Prophet, he is not referring to Jesus incorrectly, but merely describing a single aspect of His ministry- that of being THE Prophet who will bring His people back to God.

Q. (Acts 4:8-11): I love how the Holy Spirit takes over Peter’s speech here.  I have heard other people say how sometimes when talking to someone about God that they can’t believe what comes out of their mouth.  They felt the Holy Spirit control their speech.

A. That is certainly the implication of what Jesus advised His followers during the Last Supper — sometimes if we act in boldness to proclaim His truth, we never know the ways that God might show up via the Spirit.

Q. (Acts 5:1-11): Would it have been a big deal for Ananias and Sapphira to keep some of the money anyway?  I take it that it’s just because they lied about giving the full amount to the apostles when they didn’t?

A. I think the deceit is certainly the big deal — they were attempting to show off to the community, while keeping some of the money to themselves.  And this is exactly what Peter says: you could have kept some of the money, but you chose to lie about it.

Q. (Acts 5:15): How could Peter’s shadow heal people?  Peter seems to be taking a lead position with the disciples.

A. I have no idea.  And yes, Peter will be the primary focus of Acts for the first half of the story, and then someone else will take over.

Q. (Acts 5:31): How do the people know that God put Jesus at His right hand?  Through the apostles teaching?

A. Peter is not necessarily referring to an ACTUAL throne, but rather that Jesus is in the place of honor, as we have discussed.  The right hand was a trusted advisor who had the “ear” of the King.

Q. (Acts 5:33-41): If the Jewish leaders accepted Gamaliel’s advice, why did they flog the disciples?  I guess flogging is OK, but death is not?

A. I think they were looking for a way to take out their jealous feelings, and perhaps make one more attempt to push the disciples into silence.  Fat chance.

Day 236 (Aug. 24): God tells Jeremiah to purchase land, God tells of people returning and restoring Canaan to all of its glory, God gives a promise of restoration to the Israelites and a desire to worship Him, God tells of a righteous descendant, Tyre celebrates Jerusalem’s demise which Tyre says will be great for their economy

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Jeremiah 32-33:26

Ezekiel 26:1-14

Questions & Observations

Q. (Jeremiah 32:1): I thought it would be a good idea to give the status of the main characters in this story.  I think it’s captivating to have two prophets at the center of attention.

A. Jehoiachin: Captured by King Nebuchadnezzar, Jehoiachin is in Babylon under some form of guard (we don’t know exactly) along with around 3,000 Jews, including Ezekiel and Daniel, who were taken from Judah as the “best and brightest” in order to assimilate them into Babylonian culture.  According to 2 Kings 25, Jehoiachin was a prisoner of some sort for almost forty years (which we are still in the “middle” of), and was probably taken captive in 598 BC.  My notes indicate that the Jews, both in Jerusalem and in Babylon, still think of him as the true king, and not…

Zedekiah: Still in Jerusalem, as king, surrounded by other stubborn, wicked leaders and about to be captured.

Jeremiah: Currently imprisoned in the court of Zedekiah, but we do not know how long he is there.  The Babylonians will show him great kindness after Jerusalem is destroyed, and he will live out his days in one of the regions near Jerusalem (we don’t know where exactly) under the governor appointed by Babylon to control Judah after Jerusalem’s destruction.

Ezekiel: Ezekiel is one of the Jews taken into captivity by Babylon, and as such, his messages are primarily directed at them.  We don’t really know anything more than we he has been telling us in his writings about his circumstances (i.e. the death of his wife), and there is no record of his death, but the dating given in the text tells us that he heard from the Lord beginning around 590 BC, around 9 years into his captivity, and concluding, possibly with his death, in 570 BC.

Nebuchadnezzar: The story tells us that the great king attacked and conquered Jerusalem at least twice: the first time to take the captives as we have mentioned, and the second time to stamp out the revolt of king Zedekiah and a potential alliance with Egypt.  I do not know if he will be mentioned again in Jeremiah or Ezekiel, but I know Daniel has more to say about him.

Q. (32:8): How could Jeremiah pay for land when he was in prison?  I guess this was just God giving another demonstration to the Israelites via Jeremiah.  I wondered if Jeremiah would lose out on his purchase since he was in prison and Judah was going to be flattened.  But, the sealed deed was place into a pottery jar to preserve it.  So, this is a sign from God that there will be something for the Israelites to come back to.  They will be restored to Canaan.

A. We might think of Jeremiah as being more under house arrest rather than in a prison, so there is no reason to think that he would not have access to money.  God’s direction for Jeremiah to BUY the field despite Jerusalem’s impending destruction tells us, I think, all we need to know about God’s plans to restore His people.  Keep in mind through, as we’ve discussed, the people who are taking these actions won’t be around to see it — 70+ years is a long time.

Q. (32:18): We read previously where God was going to take away the requirements where several generations pay for their ancestor’s sins.  But here, Jeremiah accuses God of punishing more generations than the accused.

A. What we established, as I recall it anyway, was that the death that is required of sin was only on the generation that actually committed the sin, i.e. you don’t die for sins your father or mother committed, but the consequences of sin can pass from generation to generation: that has remained unchanged to this day.

Q. (32:39-40): Does this apply to God’s relationship with us today, or is it just for the Israelites?  I have a desire in my heart to follow God and I can’t imagine not worshipping Him.  But on my pessimistic side, I thought, “Well, God doesn’t always do good for me.”  Then, I remembered that He does do good for me, just not always what I want Him to do.

A. Hang in there, the NT will redefine everything that happens between God and man.  For the moment of our timeline, His words only refer to the Jews, but that will change.

Q. (Ezekiel 26:1-14): God was upset with Tyre because they rejoiced at the fall of Jerusalem or because they desired to become greater than Jerusalem?

A. The verses imply that Tyre hoped to reap the benefits of Jerusalem being wiped out (remember what I wrote about Jerusalem being an important trade point?) by taking over this trade.  God was not pleased by this part gloating and part greed.