Day 347 (Dec. 13): Jealousy prevents close relationship with God, God has power to judge not humans, boasting is a sin, luxury is gained through suffering of others, patience in suffering, earnest prayer of a righteous person has power, believers should save wandering believers by bringing them back to the cross, Paul writes Timothy, Law of Moses teachers are good for teaching the lawless, Paul is thankful for God’s mercy after he blasphemed Jesus, Paul tells Timothy to cling to his faith, pray for everyone, Jesus is only one who can reconcile God and man

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

James 4-5:20

1 Timothy 1-2:15

Questions & Observations

Q. (James 4:2b-3): I must be guilty of this passage.  I do pray for God to bless us with more work.  He has but we could use more.  I want that so we don’t struggle to pay the bills and buy groceries.  I want it so I can buy a new computer and start another phase of this BibleBum journey which I am so looking forward to.  I want to not have to dip into our savings.  OK, that’s enough of that, you get the picture.  But, I also want to have some money to make repairs to the house and afford a nice, reasonable vacation.  Although spending quality time together with my family would give me “pleasure,” I think it’s also nice to strengthen our bond.  Families are so important!  Does pleasure here mean a mansion, a nice sports car, lavish trips, etc.?

A. I believe that James is talking about people who are not truly seeking God in the midst of their desire for riches and pleasure.  The standard is 10% to the church, be generous with what you have beyond the 10%, and you should be in good shape.  God is aware of obligations and the difficulty of certain seasons — we’ve been going through one at my house as well — but if you withhold from generosity for the purpose of gathering money above what you need, then that is when I feel we have slipped into greed, which is what James is speaking of.  We should always be listening to the conviction of the Holy Spirit to let us know when we have slipped away from what God desires — and remember that God WANTS us to repent and come back to Him, not to feel guilt for our failures.

Q. (4:9b): Can you explain, “Let there be sadness instead of laughter, and gloom instead of joy”?

A. He’s talking about repentance in this passage, not just in this verse.  Having a spirit of repentance for one’s sin makes one humble before God, and that is a spirit that God can use ­— or as James puts it, to “lift up in due time.”

Q. (4:11-12): What law are they talking about here?  I’m confused if it’s the NT or the OT.

A. James is referring to the OT law, but saying that Christians should not scorn it by slandering each other and violating what it instructs about loving each other.

Q. (4:17): This is so eye-opening.  Whenever I doubt what I believe God is directing me to, I get a bad feeling — one of self-doubt, weakness, etc.  But, when I talk about it with confidence, I get fulfilled like God is saying “yes!” and “you go, girl!”  I told my husband that our pastor, Zack, had said that it was a sin to worry too.  Is that right?  To me, that goes along the lines with me worrying about my salvation.  It certainly doesn’t do any good to worry about it and takes up brain time that could be used to serve God.

A. James is talking here about one category of sins — that of omission — knowing the right thing to do and NOT doing it is just as sinful as doing the wrong thing you know you shouldn’t.  Worry is one of those things, as we have discussed: it shows a lack of faith in a God who has proclaimed loud and clear that He will provide for our needs.  Just remember that removing sin of that sort is a process, and won’t happen overnight.

Q. (5:12): What does James mean by “never take an oath?”  Is it the same thing that we talked about way back when the Scripture said to not make promises?

A. It is very similar to what James’ half brother, Jesus, said in Matthew 5:33-37 about oaths: don’t flippantly use God’s name to get what you want.  Just speak the truth, and don’t swear by anything to do so.

Q. (1 Timothy 1:3-11): So these teachers are spending time preaching the Law of Moses when, although that’s good for the lawless to help set them straight, it does no good for those believers who should be hearing that Jesus will save them, not obeying laws.

A. My notes indicate that these false teachers were going well beyond the Law of Moses into endless speculation around things like obscure genealogies of the OT.  That’s what he means by endless speculation and talk, which was taking them away from being active servants of God.  They were missing the “boat,” so to speak.

Q. (1:20): I just wondered how the guy downstairs got two different names — the devil and Satan.  And, then there’s his given name of Lucifer, right?

A. Part of the issue is the difference of language between the OT and NT.  The words “Satan” (accuser) and “Lucifer” (light bringer, which occurs ONLY in Isaiah 14:12) are both OT/Hebrew words.  The word “devil” (slanderer) is a NT word, first used in Matthew 4 to refer to Jesus’ tempter, but it means the same thing as “Satan,” simply in Greek instead of Hebrew.

Q. (2:9-10): This Scripture has it’s roots in a situation Paul dealt with where women were distracting a worship service by having revealing clothes, right?  But, I would think this would apply today also.  I would say it would apply to men, but I never see them dressed inappropriately at church.  And, I have seen plenty of Christian women today who are not modest.

A. I agree: modesty and humility are often forsaken Christian values that it would do us a great deal of good to rediscover.

Q. (2:11-15): Here we go with the women’s rights questions.  Does this still apply today that women should not teach men?  And, would this be for anything, including business matters, or just matters of the Bible?  Also, Adam allowed himself was deceived by Eve.  What does “women will be saved through childbearing” mean?

A. Your answer to “does this apply today?” question is in the eye of the beholder: some modern denominations — Roman Catholics, Orthodox, and Southern Baptist are among them — see this verse as still being applicable today, but ONLY when in reference to preaching from the Word and specifically leading a congregation: this is why these groups do not ordain women.  Other denominations — United Methodists, Episcopalians, and the more frankly liberal denominations, argue that this is a relic verse that can be ignored.  I’ve heard good arguments for both, with the limits on women’s role in the church being traced back to different, God-given roles, but some of the best ministers I have personally heard preach were women, so I don’t have a strong opinion either way.  As to the “saved by childbearing” verse, I don’t really know what Paul is after here, but there is a lot of speculation that is not worth going into.  I wouldn’t sweat that verse too much.

Day 263 (Sept. 20): Israelites hear Law of God (Law of Moses), Israelite camped out on roofs for Festival of Shelters, Israelites confess their sins and that of their ancestors, Israelites agree to obey laws, Israelites promise to not marry outside their nation

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Nehemiah 8:13-10:39

Questions & Observations

O. (Nehemiah 8:13-18): Sounds like fun, a big campout!

Q. (9:1-38, 10:29): It’s amazing that after all this time, all the different rulers, all the destruction and moving around that these laws are still intact and are legible.  The priests and Levites do not sound like they are taking Israel’s offenses lightly.  What kind of curse would they put on themselves if they broke the laws?

A. I suspect that the curses they are thinking of/describing are similar to the ones in Deuteronomy 28, beginning around verse 15.  Among them are curses on the land, children, herds, and that God will cause disease, mildew, and pain upon the people, and that they will have no victory in battle.  Sounds pretty bad.

Q. (10:36): What does it mean when they give God their oldest sons?

A. They’re talking about the dedication of the firstborn son, which God required as part of the covenant relationship (i.e. what they sealed with each boy in his circumcision) as first described in Exodus 13.  God struck down the firstborn sons of Egypt in the final plague, but spared the firstborn sons of Israel with the lamb’s blood.  So in keeping with that tradition, God demanded of the nation that as long as they were His people, they must understand that the “firstborns” of each generation owe their life to Him.

Q. (10:35-37): All of these offerings go to the Temple, but what happens to them.  Most of them are burnt on the altar?  What about the fruit and grain?  Some of it goes to feed the priests and Levites?

A. Some of it was given to the priests and Levites, some of it was stored or given to the poor, and yes, some of it was consumed on the altar.

Day 254 (Sept. 11) God says Temple will surpass former glory, God tells Zechariah to warn Israelites not to repeat sins of ancestors, God chooses Zerubbabel, Angel of the Lord and patrols of the earth bring messages of prosperity, four sinful nations and four overthrowers, Jerusalem will prosper again, exiles called home, God encourages Jeshua the high priest, lampstands and olive trees vision shows nothing can overcome God’s protection, flying scroll contains curse to go over land, vision of flying women carrying basket of sins to Babylonia

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Haggai 2:1-9

Zechariah 1:1-6

Haggai 2:10-19

Ezra 5:2 / 520 BC

Haggai 2:20-23

Zechariah 1:7-5:11

Questions & Observations

Q. (Haggai 2:1-9): Just to clarify, the Temple has not been rebuilt since the exiles returned, right?  We have just heard of the new Temple’s gloriousness through God’s visions to his messengers?

A. They have worked on it some, but no, it is not yet complete.

Q. Can you just tell us, in a nutshell, what the Temple means to God and why rebuilding it should be important to the Israelites?

A. It is the center of their place of worship, and the place where Israel can once again be in the very presence of God.  I would say that is pretty important.

Q. (2:19): Why would God decide to bless them because it doesn’t appear that they are looking toward God?  (I am confused about whether the message about disobedience is being addressed to the returning exiles or their ancestors.)

A. Generally, I would say that the message was “to” the dead exiles, but it is serving as a warning to the present generation.

Q. (2:20-23): Why is God going to “shake the heavens and earth”?  Just all the sinning in these other nations?

A. It is a message of judgment against the nations, yes.  With many of these powerful nations at war with each other (Persia, Greece, etc.), it was a very unstable time, where the size of the armies could make the very ground shake.  That might be what God has in mind.

Q. (Zechariah 1:8): Is there any significance to the colors of the horses?  Any idea what the duties are of the Angel of the Lord?  We have learned that the Angel speaks for God.  Could the Angel of the Lord be any angel or a specific one?

A. The colors (red, brown, and white) would be best understood as war (bloodshed), partial peace (conflict), and peace (white).  It appears for this passage that the Angel is given the task of “gathering” information for God: why that would be necessary for God is unknown to me.  We do not know which Angel is mentioned, so we cannot tell if it is Michael or another angel we have encountered before.

Q. (1:18-2:6): There are four horns, four blacksmiths and four winds.  Significance?

A. The four horns (they are probably metal or artificial horns) are probably Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, and Persia: symbolic of the nations that subdued Israel over the last several centuries.  Since there are four of them, they are dealt with by four different smiths, who might be angels of judgment, as we will see in Revelation.

Q. (3:8-9): Who is the Branch?  Why seven facets to the stone?

A. It is a term of the Messiah.  The facets (symbolic of eyes) seem to represent the eyes of the infinite (7 being the number for God’s completeness).  We will see this image of seven eyes used again in Revelation, since Zechariah is an influential book on John the writer.

Q. (5:4): What does it mean to swear falsely?

A. To lie, usually under oath or after swearing that you are telling the truth in God’s name.

Q. (5:5-11): What does this story mean?  Is Babylonia the same as Babylon?

A. It is a summary of the process of the “purging” of the idolatry — personified as a woman named Wickedness — from the land of Israel.  The “woman” was taken from the good land to a land of idolatry (Babylonia — the region rather than the nation of Babylon), and things would not be made right back in Israel until this curse had been purged.