Day 30 (Jan. 30): The Lord asks Job Who he is, God’s power and knowledge are endless

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Be sure to check out the link to the video at the end of the Q&As!

Job 38-40:5

Questions & Observations

Q. (Job 38:1-40:2): God puts Job in his place.  What do you say about God’s use of sarcasm in (38:21)?

A. God is certainly putting Job in his place.  Apparently, God felt that Job needed some convincing about who was who in their relationship, and it appears He considered sarcasm a useful rhetorical tool in His epic beat down.

O. I am always looking around in amazement at everything God weaved.  These verses open your eyes to the vast amount of control and care God has for all of His creation.  I think God is addressing Job’s pride here.  How can Job boast that He is so righteous, so undeserving of his devastation?  God says that Job has not begun to match Him in his power, so Job has no right to question God’s ways.  He should know that God is all powerful and has His reasons … and will take care of him like He does everything else.

O. (39:9-12): At first read, I read this just as another “power” testimony.  After reading it a second time, I saw God as the owner and the ox as humans.  Basically, can God trust us that we will abide in Him, work for Him, trust in Him, bring Him glory and others?  Can He trust us, even though we have a will or our own?  Anybody else get that interpretation or another one?

Q. (39:13-18): Rob, can you comment on this one.  It has me a little at a loss other than in 39:18, He may be talking of everyone has their own gifts and should use them accordingly.

A. I think God is telling Job that even in an animal so dumb it doesn’t protect its own young, He has poured His creative energy: even the dumb ostrich is incredibly powerful.  I don’t think you should be looking for human applications in these verses: God is showing off.  It gets better in the next section!

Q. (39:19-25): To me, this is saying that we need to be ready and able for God.  We have to know that the road ahead may be bumpy and have some major battles.  Although the battles may make us uneasy, our loyalty and love will make us excited to do God’s work.  Rob?

A. As with the previous question, I would be careful about trying to gain human insight into God’s monologue.  I think God is really talking about horses: wild creatures (even when tamed) that He created.  He appears to be saying that He delights in the raw power and untamed heart of these animals.  God is saying, “Look at My majesty on display in nature.  You didn’t create this.  I did.”

O. (40:3-5): I picture Job in the Naughty Seat right now.  I joke of this, but I shouldn’t.  I am in the Naughty Seat a lot!  My latest is wanting something to change and getting angry inside because of the way it is.  Instead, I should hand it over to God.  If He wants it to change, He’ll make it change.  I can pray about it, but that doesn’t mean God will make it change immediately or at all.  What I do know that He’s in control and I look forward to what He reveals to me.  It may be me that has a change instead of the thing I think needs to be changed.

O. (40:3-5): ‘Nuf said!

Rob found this super cool video that tells Job in a nutshell.  Check it out!  http://vimeo.com/14254004

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