Day 331 (Nov. 27): Paul looks to Gentiles salvation to make Israelites jealous, God’s mercy is for everyone, treat everyone with the love of Christ, respect authority, clothe yourself in Jesus and resist evil desires, steer away from criticism, do not cause others to stumble in their faith, respect authority,

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Romans 11-14

Questions & Observations

Q. (Romans 11:1-24): There are several questions I have in this passage.  Here are the questions:

1) Vs. 5-6.  I’m not sure what Paul is describing here.

A. Paul is saying that even among the remnant of His faithful people, they were saved by His grace, not their own actions.  That’s all.

2) V. 7: My understanding of this is that some Israelites remained faithful to God — they didn’t worship idols — and because of their loyalty, they are chosen.  And, God hardened the hearts of those that were not faithful to further divide the good from the bad, which would bring Him glory — just like he did with Pharaoh.  Those with hardened hearts take the role of the bad guys and kind of “push the envelope” of God’s plan a little farther into action so that his faithful will see His glory.

A. Yes, that sounds right, though I admit it sounds a little “off” to our modern ears.

3) V. 12, 15: Why would the world be better when the Israelites finally accept Jesus as their savior.  Is this still valid with Jews today?  And, v. 15 is the same idea?

A. That’s a mystery I don’t really have a good answer for, but yes, verse 15 reinforces the same idea.

4) V. 16b: So people can be saved just because they belong to a family whose leaders are faithful to God?

A. No.  They have the POTENTIAL to be saved because God is faithful to the family of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, but that does not ultimately help the individual.

O. (12:15): I have always taken notice of popularity contests: who people choose to attach themselves to based on the others’ status — popularity, wealth, personality, goodness, badness.  I had a friend where we used to live who I think has a great soul.  But, every time a situation came up where she had two groups of friends going to the same event — notably fireworks kicking off the Christmas season — she would choose one group over us and another family.  I don’t know why we couldn’t just all hang out together.  We all knew one another.  Anyway, it was awkward.  She kept us hanging saying that she may meet us there.  But, she would show up with the other group and barely give us the time of day if she saw us.  To her defense, it is hard to know whether to invite people from different branches of your life to the same function.  There can be that awkwardness.  But, I think it’s short-lived.  Like Paul says here: We all live in harmony and we are to enjoy everyone’s company.

Q. (13:1-7): I think we talked about this in the OT.  I understand this passage in the context of the times of the OT, but I have a hard time with accepting that authority shouldn’t be questioned in our government.  After all, that’s why the Pilgrims left England because they were not allowed to worship God the way they wanted.  So, I would say that they didn’t have respect for their leaders.

A. I think what you’ve done is provide the exception that proves the rule.  In many cases, Christians today (Americans in particular) have a “persecuted” mindset, and part of it has to do with the government.  Now there are some threats to religious liberty out there, but there is no active persecution of Christians today in this country that in any way compares to what was happening with the Puritans/Pilgrims (Happy Thanksgiving!) or, frankly, what is taking place in more than 50 countries around the world today including China and North Korea.  Unless we are under a TRUE threat, Paul desires that we submit to the authorities above us.  Don’t take that to mean, however, that we must AGREE with them, or that we cannot act in a peaceful manner to change the law.  I see nothing against these actions in what Paul is saying.

O. (14:1-23): Wow, there’s a lot said here.  1) Mind your own beeswax (look up the origins of this saying for some humorous theories).  2) God doesn’t care what we eat.  But, if one cares what he/she eats, then they need to stand firm on their convictions.  3) And, if one does not believe in the same way, they should not cause a rift and eat according to the other’s wishes.  V. 17 sums it up: For the Kingdom of God is not a matter of what we eat or drink, but of living a life of goodness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit.  Basically, love one another.  Another verse says to not act like you know everything, making others feel inferior or irritated.  We do not lift up God by lifting up ourselves and putting others down.  Together, we are all integral to completing the body of Christ, so we should treat each other with love.

O. (15:22b-23): Wow, this speaks to me.  My hubby can basically eat anything and not have any side effects.  Me, I’m another story.  I became a vegan in college because I had a VERY liberal Political Science professor who showed my class a movie about the meat industry in America.  I think a lot of it has been fixed now, but I’m sure a lot still goes on. Anyway, after I saw the film, I tried to eat a Hawaiian pizza with Canadian bacon on it.  I couldn’t do it, so I subconsciously became a vegan.  Now, though, I can no longer have all the soy I want.  I switched to almond milk because soy milk started tearing me up.  I started to notice that my brain felt heavy and cloudy after coffee, chocolate — basically, caffeine.  Now, I’m starting to give credit to that feeling I have.  Now I notice it after a lot of processed foods, which I’m an avid eater of protein bars for lunch.  But, whenever it’s brought up in conversation, there is this awkward feeling like me or whomever is telling their diet tales is trying to affect the others.  Long ago, I made a decision to try to not make others feel weird around me being a vegan and it’s worked well.  However, several of my friends have gone gluten free and say they feel more alive because of it.  I feel pressure to try it.  But, giving up bread is not something I want to do to solve my dietary issues.  But, now that I’m paying attention to what gives me that feeling, I can hopefully figure it out.  I give the Holy Spirit the credit for helping me realize what foods are good and bad for my body.

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