Day 337 (Dec. 3): Paul tells his story to crowd but is rebuked, Paul tells of Roman citizenship to thwart lashing, Paul goes before high council, Jews conspirte to kill Paul, Paul is sent to Caesarea

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Acts 21:37-23:35

Questions & Observations

Q. (Acts 22:3, 22:25): Paul said he was from Tarsus, but then he says he was born in Rome.  These two places are far apart aren’t they?

A. Ha!  Being a Roman citizen is not the same as being BORN in Rome.  A Roman citizenship could be granted in any province of the Empire — including Tarsus, where Paul is from — and it would mean that Paul’s family was wealthy and influential.  It basically means that Paul was an official citizen of the Roman Empire, which put him squarely under the protection of the commander and governor.  Paul is pulling out his “trump card” here in order to “move up the ladder” and witness to those in authority.

Q. (22:22-23): I guess the crowd didn’t like Paul’s story?

A. Nope, they did not, but it won’t matter.

Q. (23:6): This is the first time I’ve heard Paul call himself a Pharisee.  Why did he do that?

A. Because he was one — he will talk about it more in Philippians — but he did so in this case to divide Sadducee and Pharisee in order to, again, avoid trouble and remove himself from the situation.  He’s clever in that way.

Day 320 (Nov. 16): Paul preaches in Athens, Paul reflects on his visit, Timothy’s report about the church, live to please God, hope of resurrection

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Acts 17:16-18:3

1 Thessalonians 1-5:11

Questions & Observations

Q. (1 Thessalonians 1:6): What is Paul talking to the church in Thessalonica about them suffering?

A. We read about it yesterday’s reading (Acts 17:5-14), where a Christian named Jason was targeted by hostile Jews and slandered, possibly being beaten in the process.  It appears that this was part of the type of persecution and suffering Christians received in Thessalonica after Paul escaped.

O. Through his letters, we see how incredibly close Paul feels to the Christians in these different cities.  What freedom Paul and other Christian teachers must have felt to preach and devote all of their time to educating others about Jesus.  I think of our sermon last week at church where the pastor said to throw away those things that bind you and get on with your own personal mission.  This blog just kind of came together at the last minute, thanks to my hubby, Jessica at our church and Rob (big thanks!).  It came together and I didn’t give it a second thought about doing it.  I just did it.  Now, I want to take it further, producing products that would be in your everyday life for everyone to see.  But, I have to wait on some funding to do that.  It’s taking longer than I thought it would for the funding part, but I know God’s hand is in it, so I know whatever happens will be what he wants.  But to let go of those chains that bind, like pride and patience, I have to wait for God to make it the right time.  He orchestrates well, so I need to leave it in his hands.  Doing that is the hard part.  But, Paul and the other teachers of the Gospel, just handed it all over to God and let him do the work of putting their missionary work together.

Q. (4:6): So God will avenge those who have sinned sexually?  I have always thought that when someone has immoral sexual practices that they are hurting themselves, hurting the ones they are in relationships with, etc.  I never thought about sexual immorality hurting God.

A. All sin is ultimately against God, whether directly via blasphemy, or indirectly by hurting one of His children.  And while I see the rhetorical point Paul is going for here, I do not believe that there is something about sexual sin that God will punish or “avenge” more than other sin.  This passage is meant to be a warning to those who were committing sexual sin, but all sin is punished, one way or another.

Q. (4:11): I would think that by “quiet life” mentioned here would mean don’t party, don’t be the center of attention, don’t be obnoxious or rude.

A. Don’t forget gossip, which is your classic combination of not being “quiet” when you should be and also not “minding your own business.”  I suspect that Paul is writing to people who had taken a bit too much interest in the affairs of others.

O. (5:11): Love this verse!

Day 319 (Nov. 15): Letter for Gentile believers, Paul and Barnabas separate, Timothy joins Paul, Paul and Silas are called to Macedonia, Paul baptizes Lydia, Paul commands demon out of girl, Paul and Silas imprisoned and miraculously released, Paul and Silas ran out of Thessalonica, Paul welcomed in Berea

46 more days to the finale!

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Acts 15:22-17:15

Questions & Observations

Q. (Acts 15:28): So, these are the laws that some church officials, along with the Holy Spirit, decided were to still be obeyed?  The rest of the laws go to the wayside?  I hope they were also told of the new law.

A. I think what this council decided is that these practices were the ones that most separated out Christians from the surrounding culture of idol sacrifice, which was common in the Roman world.  This isn’t a new law, but guidelines in how to be a Christian in a hostile world without corrupting yourself.  We will see the sacrifices to idols issue come up again.

Q. (Acts 15:36-41): I don’t know if there is any significance to this argument between Paul and Barnabas.  They had been together for so long.  I guess Christians can still be stubborn and disagree?

A. I’ve read different commentaries that downplay whether or not this was an actual “fight” or just a difference of opinion that led to a parting of ways.  It may have been the Spirit’s desire to see them separated so that they could cover twice the ground, if you will.  But there is no getting around that we Christians are still human, and can be subject to disagreement.  I was having a friendly argument about the merits of megachurches (he feels they are wasteful) just today, so yea, it still happens.  God uses even our disagreements to advance His Kingdom.

Q. (Acts 16:1-5): Here Paul is encouraging Timothy to be circumcised when Paul just spoke out against it and especially to Peter when he rebuked him for obeying old laws because he was scared of being criticized by Jews.

A. I think he was trying to ensure that Timothy would be accepted by the non-Christian Jews and be allowed in places like the Temple, which was forbidden to non-Jews.  I doubt Paul did this — or Timothy volunteered for it — in order to accommodate Christians.

Day 316 (Nov. 12) Angel aids Paul in escaping from prison, God strikes dead Herod Agrippa for taking glory, Barnabas and Paul preach together in Cyprus and Paphos, Paul accuses governor’s sorcerer, governor became believer, Paul preaches at Antioch of Pisidia’s synagogue, Paul intrigues Gentiles, Paul and Barnabas ran from Antioch of Pisidia to Iconium where they were run from town also, Paul heals crippled man in Lystra, Paul stoned but didn’t die

Only 49 days to the end!

Welcome to BibleBum where we are exploring the entire Bible in one year to better learn how to follow God’s instructions and discover the purpose for our lives.  The BibleBum blog uses The One Year Chronological Bible, the New Living Translation version.  At the end of each day’s reading, Rob, a cultural history aficionado and seminary graduate, answers questions from Leigh An, the blogger host, about the daily scripture.  To start from the beginning, click on “Index” and select Day 1.

Acts 12:6-14:20

Questions & Observations

Q. (Acts 12:6-19): Whether Peter was rescued for his own faith or because he had people praying for him or both, I think we can take from this scene, the results that can be realized through group prayer.  Rob, can you tell us of any verses where God or Jesus is telling us to pray together?

A. Actually, that is not a topic that Jesus really addressed outside of Matthew 18:19-20, which says that He is there in our midst when we gather and will give us what we seek, which is certainly applicable here.  It is the other works of the NT that will have more to say about this topic, so keep watching.

Q. (Acts 13:3): Also, can you tell us more about the “laying of hands.”

A. Sure: it was a way for a community to pray for a person.  The person prayed for would sit or stand in the midst of a group, and the group would place hands upon that person as they prayed — something many churches still do today.  It is frankly nothing especially complicated, but is merely a method of community praying.

Q. (Acts 13:9): I always thought that Saul became Paul after his transformation to Christianity.  But, as I googled it and referred to Wikipedia, I see that Saul is his Jewish name and Paul is his Roman name.  It says that he used Paul to put those to whom he was preaching at ease.

A. It is a common assumption that Saul’s name change to Paul was divinely inspired, the way that God changed Abram’s name to Abraham and Jacob to Israel, but that is not the case.  You have the right information on what Paul was doing, using his name to make the people more open to his message.  This will not be the last time that Paul will take advantage of his dual life.  Paul was a devout Jew in his former life as Saul, which helps him address Jews with authority, as he will do in Philippians.  And he will also pull out his Roman citizenship — something quite valuable in his day — when necessary as well to get out of trouble.  No doubt about it Paul is resourceful.

Q. (Acts 13:48): What does the author mean here when he says, “and all who were chosen for eternal life became believers.”  This makes it sound like the Kingdom of God uses predestination.

A. There is certainly some role of selection in the Kingdom, but once again I would point out: we do not know what is the criteria that makes a person “selected”.  It’s very possible that it is faith in God that makes one selected.

Q. (Acts 14:19-20): Is there any point worth mentioning about Paul being stoned, but not dead?

A. I guess what happened is that the people assumed he was dead, but he was not.  This verse is part of the reason that many scholars think that Paul was disfigured by this incident and the others to come — it will not be his last brush with trouble — but it certainly gave him a powerful witness.